YouTubers: Part One-How They Make Money

Onovu Otitigbe-Dangerfield, Co-Editor-in-Chief

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Jake and Logan Paul. David Dobrik. PewdiePie. Emma Chamberlain. Tessa Monegeu. Do any of these names ring a bell? In our 21st century society, the emergence of a new profession has swept the world: that of YouTubers. The world has become increasingly complex and supportive of non traditional careers, which happens to include making videos that explain gaming hacks, or makeup tutorials to surprising people with cars. With this profession however, a growing number of people question how these individuals are able to make money. 

A YouTuber is defined as anyone who creates content for YouTube and generally they amass a large following. YouTube provides a diverse range of videos for various people with different interests and passions. YouTubers don’t typically discuss how they make their money, but there are three main ways: advertisements, sponsored videos and donations. 

According to Odyssey “Although a smaller YouTuber won’t make too much off of actual views of their videos, some advertisements before their videos offer some level of income that could become even larger and add to their pay based on view, if they become a larger YouTuber.

Additionally “sponsored videos from larger companies are only likely on bigger YouTube channels, and they generally charge a fairly large price to make sponsored videos, but some smaller YouTube channels could make a decent profit off making sponsored videos for smaller companies, since they would charge less.” Some youtubers also create websites and pages where their viewers can donate money to fuel the content. 

The number of YouTube partners’ earning 6 figures is up fifty percent from year to year, meaning more individuals are able to make more than a living off popular content. So, what’s the moral of the story? The YouTubing phenomenon is here and if you want to get on the bandwagon, it’s not too late.

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